Weekly link round up 3/8/2013

Happy International Women’s Day! Learn the history behind the date. Also, take a look at the Guardian’s interactive map of the history of women’s struggle for equal rights.

The first episode of Anita Sarkeesian’s series analyzing the portrayal of women in video games is out, and it’s pretty awesome.

Good news?  Sponsors of Tennessee’s forced ultrasound bill have withdrawn their bill.  Bad news? They want to seek a constitutional amendment to implement more reproductive health restrictions in its place.

A new bill allowing counselors and social workers to legally refuse helping clients based on their sexual orientation has unfortunately passed senate committee.

Also in depressing LGBT news, 62% of Tennesseans are against gay marriage.

Fallon Fox shares her story of becoming the first out transgender MMA athlete.

Telling a woman to get a gun is NOT rape prevention.

Men who have a preference for large breasts are more likely to be sexist.

RoleReboot explains how “masculinity” doesn’t really exist.

Feminists can be sexy and funny if they want to be.

Jill Filipovic questions why men don’t change their names when they get married (and why women often do).

Stop sexualizing transgender children (and accusing transgender people of being sexual predators in general).

In Women’s Studies:

The Women’s Resource Center has a calendar of awesome events coming up, including Diane Rehm and Soledad O’ Brien visiting campus, and WoW goes global on March 20!

Katharine Hughes posts about the recently implemented abortion restrictions in Arkansas, Virginia, and Idaho.

About etsuwomenstudies

This blog is a collaborative effort from the students, faculty, and feminist souls in the East Tennessee State University Women's Studies Department. We simply want to share daily thoughts with the world and encourage not only feminist thought, but awareness, tolerance, diversity, equality, justice, and social progress. Women's Studies is an exciting, interdisciplinary area of study that celebrates women's lives. It examines how diverse women have contributed to history, social processes, culture, politics and economics, as well as how all of these have shaped women's experiences. Our program provides new ways of looking at common assumptions about femininity and masculinity and teaches students how to connect what they study with how they live and work. We also explore how gender intersects with ability, age, class, culture, ethnicity, nationality, race, religion, and sexuality. Our Leadership through Diversity focus promotes a creative struggle for justice and equality. We train graduates to be leaders in both civic engagement and the workforce. The Women's Studies Program at ETSU is comprised of dedicated faculty and staff and socially conscious students coming together from a wide range of disciplines.

Posted on March 8, 2013, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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